Blog | HemaCare

HemaCare Immune Cells Ace Cytotoxicity Assay used to Screen Therapeutic Antibodies

Jan 22, 2019 10:15:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in NK Cells, Assay Development

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In an independent study recently published by Pfizer, [1] natural killer (NK) immune cells sourced from HemaCare were evaluated to test how well suited they are for use in cytotoxic activity assays.

These last few years have seen the successful clinical development of several monoclonal antibody-based treatments for cancer and inflammatory disease. These antibodies are designed to act in a number of different ways, from tagging target cells so they can be recognized by the immune system, to blocking growth or metastasis, to attacking problematic cells themselves. Monoclonal antibodies (m’Abs) are seen as particularly beneficial because they can be used to complement more traditional therapies and because their use generally results in fewer side effects.

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HemaCare Immune Cells Facilitate Study on Gene Activation During Stem Cell Development

Jan 15, 2019 10:04:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in hematopoietic stem cells, stem cells, genes

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A recent independent study cites using HemaCare-sourced immune cells to investigate a protein involved in gene activation during hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development. [1]

The study, published by scientists at the Yokohama Institute in Japan, is focused on the function of a protein known as RUNX1. The reason RUNX1 is of particular interest is that it’s implicated in the development of a number of different types of cancer, including breast cancer, skin cancer, and acute myeloid leukemia. [2] In the latter case, defects in the gene that codes for the RUNX1 protein disrupt stem cell differentiation. This means that instead of normal development into mature cell types, there is a massive build-up of blast cells in the bone marrow, which is the hallmark of leukemia. Scientists have known since 2001 [3] that the RUNX1 protein is involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into mature blood cells. But in order to target RUNX1’s role in cancer development, researchers need a much more in-depth knowledge of exactly how the protein is exerting its function.

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HemaCare Memory B Cells Recall Their Primary Function

Jan 8, 2019 9:59:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in immunotherapy, cryopreservation

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Global biotechnology company Immunospot cites using B cells isolated from HemaCare-sourced peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) [1] for their studies on post-cryopreservation functionality.

Expectations are high that emerging field of cell therapy will be able to deliver breakthrough treatments or cures for many diseases, including cancer. One of the most powerful facets of this new medical field is the concept of immunotherapy--using the body’s own immune cells to specifically target disease. Immune cell function is at the heart of this concept, so keeping immune cells fully operational is crucially important. In this recent study published in the journal Cells, biopharmaceutical scientists aim to investigate B cell functionality following cryopreservation.

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Happy New Year! The Top 10 HemaCare Blogs of 2018

Dec 28, 2018 9:51:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in immunotherapy, T cells, cancer treatment, CAR T cells

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2018 has flown by, and 2019 is just around the corner! As the New Year approaches, it’s good to look back at just how much has been accomplished in the field of medicine, and wonder what the future holds. As is our tradition at this time of year, we are pleased to present HemaCare’s 10 most popular blogs of the year, and the advances in healthcare that they represent. Enjoy the countdown!

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Brrr, It's Cold Outside! Managing the Cell Therapy Cold Chain

Dec 19, 2018 10:11:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in cold chain, cell therapy

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It’s getting cold out there! And while winter temperatures may have us yearning for a warm spot by the fireside, cold is a good thing for cell and gene therapies—in many cases, the colder the better. Logistics dictate that international shipping of cellular therapeutics often means freezing them first. Cryopreservation protects fragile cellular material from loss of viability or functionality during transit and storage, by halting chemical and biological degradation processes. To understand how important that is, it is worth noting that two of the hottest cell therapy drugs on the market this year (Yescarta® and Kymriah®) are both cryopreserved prior to infusion into the patient. But how cold does it really need to be to protect the efficacy of these cellular therapeutics? We decided to put that question into perspective.

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