Blog | HemaCare

Is an Unusual Immune Cell the Cause of Type I Diabetes?

Sep 24, 2019 10:20:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in Autoimmune Disorders, T Cells

0 Comments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University and IBM Thomas J Watson Research Center discovered unique autoimmune cells in type 1 diabetes.

Over 30 million people living in the United States are affected by diabetes, and 5% of those have type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder whereby the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas are destroyed by the body’s own immune system. This leads to a lack of sufficient insulin needed to assist the entry of glucose into cells, causing hyperglycemia. The mechanism of this aspect is mainly unknown. However, it is held that insulin is the target of the autoimmune attack that leads to type 1 diabetes.

Read More

The Role of Lymph Node Cells in Immune Tolerance

Sep 3, 2019 10:10:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in Autoimmune Disorders, T Cells

0 Comments

A recent study found the lymph node cells, much like the thymus, play a part in immune self-tolerance.

Nearly 5% of the U.S. population is affected with a devastating autoimmune disease, and this percentage is ever growing. Current treatments address organ inflammation or approach the autoimmunity with immunosuppression, which has serious and widespread side effects. In order to develop more specific and effective therapies, there must be a fuller understanding of the mechanisms by which self-tolerance develops. It is known that autoimmune diseases occur due to the immune system’s loss of tolerance to self-antigens. How and why this loss of tolerance occurs is associated with many factors, including genetic (and epigenetic), cellular, environmental, and more.

Read More

Targeting T Cells to Treat IBD

Sep 4, 2018 10:05:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in Autoimmune Disorders, T Cells, Helper T Cells

0 Comments

Recent research looks into the relationship between T helper cells and the autoimmune conditions of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) caused by an immune dysfunction. People with IBD can experience diarrhea, rectal bleeding, constipation, abdominal pain and cramping, fatigue, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Dysregulated responses of a subset of CD4 T cells (T helper cells) are associated with autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions and may induce and maintain intestinal inflammation, but the mechanism is not fully understood. The primary cytokine secreted by T helper cells of the intestinal mucosa of people with IBD is interferon (IFN)-gamma. Recent research was conducted to better understand the role of IFN-producing CD4 T cells in the initiation and maintenance of IBD.

Read More

Immune Research Innovations Support Multiple Sclerosis Arena

Jan 15, 2018 10:23:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in Autoimmune Disorders, immunology, Immunotherapy (Immunology)

0 Comments

Recent advances in immunology research have uncovered extensive and amazing knowledge of how many cells and other factors of the immune system identify antigens and diseased cells. However, there remain many gaps in knowledge, and filling these will help achieve even more impactful breakthroughs in the immunotherapy and vaccine arena. The Human Vaccines Project is a nonprofit organization with the goal to contribute to the development of vaccines and immunotherapies by understanding the human immune system at a deeper level.

Read More

NF-kB Activation by CD40 Is Increased in B Cells of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Possible Target of Immunotherapy

Feb 3, 2017 11:26:40 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in Autoimmune Disorders, PBMCs, stem cell research

0 Comments

An aspect of immunity involves the function of B lymphocytes (or B cells) that secrete antibodies. A protein expressed on B cells and other immune cells (CD40) is crucial for normal B cell action. CD40 interacts with a protein (CD40L) present on T cells that also contributes to B cell stimulation. This CD40-CD40L interaction is important for normal immune function. However, exaggerated B-cell responses to CD40 occur in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. It has been shown that B cells from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are stimulated by CD40 to multiply significantly more than in healthy patients.

Read More

Subscribe Here!

Posts by Topic

see all

Recent Posts