Blog | HemaCare

HemaCare Starting Material Aids Discovery of New Brain Tumor Treatment Strategy

Feb 19, 2019 10:02:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in T cells, Tumors

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An independent publication cites using HemaCare primary T-cells to investigate a novel cancer therapy based on blocking immune suppression while simultaneously promoting T-cell activity. [1]

Newly approved T-cell therapies have been eliciting enthusiastic discussion across the medical field for their unparalleled success rate in treating aggressive blood cancers. This success has unfortunately not extended to the treatment of brain tumors, where upregulation of the “immune checkpoint” molecule PDL-1 interferes with normal immune response. Now a research group based at the University of Alabama’s Medical School may have found a way to outsmart brain cancer cells that evade the body’s immune system.

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Cell Interactions for Immunotherapy and More

Feb 12, 2019 10:15:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in Dendritic cells, immunotherapy, T cells

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“Kiss-and-run” approach helps researchers observe interaction between dendritic cells and T cells.

The normal biological processes needed for living beings to develop, grow, and function involve interactions between a diversity of cell types. Targeting these cellular interactions can enhance current cell-based immunotherapy and regenerative medicine, as well as provide the basis for new ones. Studying the mechanisms of these interactions is necessary in order to understand the means by which they affect cell signaling, immunity, growth and development, and more.

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2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine Recognizes Immunotherapy Researchers

Jan 29, 2019 10:03:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in immune system, immunotherapy, T cells

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Advances in immunotherapy research to combat cancer has provided unprecedented treatment success due to the discoveries of two different Nobel Laureates, Dr. James P. Allison (U.S.) and Dr. Tasuku Honjo (Japan). Working independently, they each discovered immune system proteins that are important in self-tolerance and that can be harnessed to kill cancer cells. Checkpoint molecules prevent the immune system from killing the body’s own healthy cells. When checkpoint molecules are encountered by T cells, the cells bearing these molecules are spared attack. However, some cancer cells wear checkpoint molecules, acting as imposters of normal cells to evade attack by T cells.

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Happy New Year! The Top 10 HemaCare Blogs of 2018

Dec 28, 2018 9:51:00 AM / by Nancy Andon, MSc posted in cancer treatment, CAR T cells, immunotherapy, T cells

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2018 has flown by, and 2019 is just around the corner! As the New Year approaches, it’s good to look back at just how much has been accomplished in the field of medicine, and wonder what the future holds. As is our tradition at this time of year, we are pleased to present HemaCare’s 10 most popular blogs of the year, and the advances in healthcare that they represent. Enjoy the countdown!

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Cells May Cooperate to Treat Cancers

Oct 22, 2018 10:30:00 AM / by Stacy Matthews Branch, DVM, PhD posted in cancer treatment, immunotherapy, T cells, Natural Killer Cells, NK Cells

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Recent research reveals T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells may respond to cancer cells differently and could ultimately provide more cancer treatment options.

A leading immunotherapeutic approach to treating cancer involves the use of checkpoint inhibitors. Immune checkpoints are proteins expressed on T cells and are essential for the self-tolerance needed to prevent autoimmunity. When T-cell checkpoint molecules bind to its ligand on cells, the targeted cell is not harmed. These checkpoints are often exploited by tumor cells by possessing checkpoint molecules such as PD-L1 and impeding the immune system’s ability to initiate and carry out an immune attack on the tumor.

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